Meat Pie, Sausage Roll Come On Kearny, Give us a goal OOH, We Got a Corner!

The recipient for this full-sized fennel quilt played a LOT of soccer all over the world as well as rowing crew in the US.

I was asked specifically to applique the patch on this Stuttgart shirt as it indicated a championship for this team.

This block was a combination of sections from her Stuttgart Eagles UnderArmor shirt along with a front pocket design of the tie-dyed grey shirt.

Singlets or middies are too narrow for a full block due to the armhole cutouts.  Hence I added red knit fabric so it could square off to the 14.5″ block.

As always, I felt I really knew the recipient by the time I finished the quilt.

But the words ain’t mine, I just pass ’em along For Betsy C and her friends, I sing this song

This is a lapsize lavender quilt made for a person relocating away from Virginia to freezing cold New England.

I was inspired by Rob Appell’s State Map Applique Quilt https://mansewing.com/2018/01/state-map-applique-quilt/ but instead of using a jelly roll of coordinated prints, I used novelty fabrics with themes that would mean something to the recipient.  I blew up the outline of our Commonwealth (omitting the peninsula that hangs off MD on the other side of the Chesapeake Bay).  I then calculated the desired width of the strips by dividing the total number of strips into the widest length.  I sewed the strips together and traced the outline on the back to make a gigantic Virginia shape which was then appliqued on the background fabric.

So left to right:
The Virginia house was red brick.
The recipient lived in an historic city full of lovely old buildings.
Her favorite getaway was to beaches of Florida prolific with seashells.
The office theme was based on all the paperwork she had to complete constantly,
The next strip was a friends theme as she was a very good one to all.
The grape theme indicated all the vineyards in Northern VA and the dogwood strip of course reflected the state flower.
The black strip has her favorite drink that she would always have with dinner (although she liked margaritas on the rocks and not frozen as indicated on the fabric).
The middle strip had dog bones and pawprints to represent her beloved fox terrier.
The fabrics were then repeated in reverse order.
Because the recipient was moving up north where winters are long,  I used a variety of polar fleeces to make the backing to keep her extra-warm  One can see on the solid fleece that the quilting really pop, whereas it just blends into the fleece prints.

And I’ve been k-kicking the new k-knowledge An emcee to a degree that you can’t get in college

This is yet another Webster University Gorlok quilt.  I really loved making this one as I discovered an extra-fun design from Sew Adorkable.  Back in the day when our calculators could just do simple operations, we used to write words using the number pad and then flipping the calculator upside down.  Basically any word using only the letters B E H I G L O S could be written.  The girls tended to type in 0.7734 (when the fours used to be written with  2 vertical and one horizontal line rather than the modern 1 vertical, one horizontal, and one diagonal)   and the boys would write 58008 and variations thereof.

Image result for calculator words

In any case, the recipient’s name is Bobbie and of course her name can be written on a calculator.  She had several Webster World Works shirts with numbers on them and other Webster items as well.  Not all the numbers on the keyboard hav an actual number shirt but she did have a mousepad we used for the decimal point key and the bottoms from drink koozies that were used for the dots on the division sign. I was also supplied with a couple of Webster totebags that we incorporated as well.

The mousepad was difficult to applique and didn’t look great when it was done so I embellished the circumference with a gold lace.  All the quilting was just machine-stippling.

And then someone snuck into my quilt studio and decided to help….
I  rarely take photographs of myself but our Main Campus asked the various departments to depict ourselves doing something fun and/or silly.  As I explained in the statement that was submitted with the pictures, quilting is fun for me and I know the design was silly but I couldn’t resist as I am sort of a geek at heart.

Make you bounce, rock, roll and skate. Don’t underrate how I operate.

This was one of the most challenging projects I have ever designed.  The recipient was a competitive skater in her day. She provided 4 costumes, all of which were sequined, sparkly and very slippery. Although the fabrics weren’t stretchy, I fused interfacing to the backs and fray-checked every cut edge to make them behave.

 

 

I knew that the patriotic vest and white lacy bodysuit would work well together.  I overlaid the vest on top of the blouse.  A strip of the rainbow outfit was used as a cummerbund. I wanted to include all the fabrics on each side of the pillow, so I created a gold medal out of the neon yellow costume.

 

The other side was a bit of a challenge.  I created pillows for this person in the past using crazy quilt designs which would have worked nicely.  However I discovered a quilt block called Marcie’s Maze and given that the recipient was named Marcy, albeit spelled slightly differently, I knew this would make a great side.

Not only did I reposition sequins for this side, I also appliqued the name tags that had been sewn into the costumes.  I created the piping from the striped fabric as well. I originally wanted the yellow and the white to be reversed but it looked too much like sunny-side up eggs.

The bass is booming from down below And Norton is chillin’ with Mario

This queensized quilt is made for an Oakton alumna/current Duke Blue Devil. She will be getting married to another Duke grad shortly after graduation so this will definitely fit in their decor.

She wanted a more random layout than most so the blocks were cut in multiple sizes.   Neither sashing nor borders were desired so it was simply edged with binding.

This shirt was completely covered with quotes written in puffy paint.  This was a spirit shirt made with her cross-country team.  The quotes ran onto the sleeves so the block ended up being a fat apital T as opposed to the typical quadrilateral.  The recipient was also a swimmer so we incorporated her team bathing suit.

The recipient is very devout so in addition to the  shirts from religious camps and teen organizations, the backing was pieced as a basic cross in Duke colors.

Ponce De Leon constantly on The fountain of youth, not Robotron

This quilt was made for a baby boy named Leon. He was born on March 15 of this year. His mom used bright vibrant colors for the nursery.

idesleft
As any student of history or Shakespeare knows, March 15 is the ides of March, the day that Julius Caesar was assassinated in the Roman Senate.
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The design was inspired by the 2002 USPS stamp designed by Michael Osborne.  With 3 of the letters overlapping in the words love and leon, it was an easy switch.  The N is the logo that media network NBC used in the mid 70s.
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“Beware the ides of March.” (Shakespeare, 1998, 1.2:103).

Grab the phone, call my dad. Shared some love, felt so glad.

These two quilts were made for adult siblings whose father had died.  The mother had saved boxes of ties and had found specific ideas of how she wanted them to be constructed.
The black background quilt was for the daughter.  She loves Asian decoration and this design reminded her mother of a kimono. 37 ties (or pieces thereof) were used in this 3′ by 5′ quilt. The black background was a meandering freehand and the ties were quilted in the ditch.
As you can see in the pictures below, some ties were pieced to each other diagonally, others horizontally.  I appliqued many of the tie labels onto the quilt as well.  The father always loved West Highland Terriers hence the significance of the dog tie and dad tie in the right picture.
For the brother’s quilt, the mother wanted a loose, woven pattern of ties on a hunter green background.  There are 24 ties used all together, 12 running horizontally and 12 running vertically. The quilt was 4 ft by 4 ft which required using almost all of the tie with just a little bit left over. This was a bit tricky as there were many more directional ties than allotted spots.  I ended up basting it very closely before quilting as the needle had to go through many more layers than a normal quilt and the silk ties slipped.

 

The applique and the quilting were completed at the same time. The layout was a bit tricky as there were many more directional ties than allotted spots. Because the interlining remained in the ties for them to keep their shape, it ultimately was a very heavy quilt.

 

Now, all night long Charlie rides through the station crying, “What will become of me? How can I afford to see my sister in Boston or my parents in Cincinnati?”

This Tarragon twinsize quilt was created last year for a future Northwestern Wildcat.  I had made pillows for his siblings and aunts and a quilt and pillow for his dad so now it was his turn!

 Many of the shirts were from his early childhood, not just high school.  I loved the fact that several of the shirts had transferred photographs like the beautiful Basset Hound you see below.  One of the blue mini-designs is from a neckerchief he wore at camp.

Amongst other activities Charlie played baseball.  I have no idea if this was a high school spiritwear shirt or from a Babe Ruth or JCC team but I DO know he was number 26.

The entire family are huge fans of the various Cincinnati professional teams.  The Reds shirt is from Spring Training in Florida.  I quilted heavily around the alligator so that the head would really pop.

I hope that this quilt has kept him warm during those frigid Chicago winters!

On brave old Army team, on to the fray. Fight onto victory, for that’s the fearless Army way

This is a project from nearly 2 decades ago.  We were stationed at the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY.  The colonel was retiring so the officers’ wives got together and made his spouse a memory quilt of different cross-stitch West Point scenes.This quilt was entirely hand-pieced and hand-quilted.

The majority of the designs were from a cross-stitch sampler sold by the Association of Graduates.  Trophy Point, the 3 chapels, a full-dress cadet, the Army mule, the parade hat (otherwise known as a tar bucket), Washington Hall and the cannon were all designed by the sampler artist. We also supplemented the quilt squares with the USMA crest and designs specific to the family.  The crest was from a book entitled Needlepoint Insignia of the Armed Forces, t and the DMI and Rho Chi graphs I believe were found on the internet.

The department that this colonel ran for 6 years was the Department of Military Instruction.  DMI faculty taught tactics, leadership, ran the summer training and much more. Their offices and classrooms were in Washington Hall.. If you haven’t guessed, the West Point colors are black grey, and gold.  These colors represent the 3 components of gunpowder: charcoal, saltpeter, and sulfur. We used an attic windows block to keep each design separate and distinct.  The sashing for the attic windows came from the black shirts cadets wear to class and the grey pants.  The braided border incorporated the same fabrics plus the white full-dress pants worn for parades and balls.  I think the DMI lettering, the NY quilt block, and the Rho Chi designs came from internet searches.  The remaining images were designed by yours truly.

The colonel’s family was a lovely group.  The oldest child babysat for my kids. She was quite an athlete (still is) so she was depicted in a soccer uniform. Her brothers were also athletes so they are shown wearing football and basketball uniforms.  The oldest boy ended up at USAFA and is now a fighter pilot flying F-16s. Ironically, the baby of the family is the tallest of all and played on the University of Virginia National Championship Mens Lacrosse team. Dad is in his dress blues and Mom is in a Valkyrie dress complete with a Viking helmet as DMI was well known for the annual Viking fest tailgate.  Black Lab Bud lived to a ripe old age but he is now gone.

Like many of the officers’ wives on base, both Mrs. DMI and I were West Point tour guides.  We provided historical information and interesting trivia to many USMA visitors. I was going to dress her in the tour guide uniform but thought the Viking outfit was more fitting.

They lived in a beautiful set of Old English South quarters that overlooked the Hudson River.  This was a complicated image to design and complete but I managed.  Here is a much more realistic image from the USMA Housing Office.

Hear the beat of dancing feet, It’s the song I love, the melody of Forty-Second Street.

 
Many of the recipients of my quilts have seen my work elsewhere and then want something created to reflect his or her life.  This quilt was no exception..The person who received this quilt was a classmate of a fellow LB Bruin.

 
We decided to veer away from the typical sashing grid design by making the quilt look like a Broadway Playbill. while sticking to a twin/tarragon size.  Both fonts were sized up to scale. The letters for the larger word were appliqued onto the yellow background.  The smaller word was drawn with permanent fabric markers.
 
 
Most playbills usually have white borders but since this quilt was headed off to college, we went with grey as it would be easier to keep clean.
 
 
This shirt was designed as a plain white shirt with the black lettering.  The kids involved in this show had wanted to tie-dye the shirts but never got around to it.   I drew a rainbow on both the big design and mini design using permanent fabric markers.