Circle circle, dot dot. I got my chemo shot.

Although at my age I don’t recognize birthdays, this year I did celebrate the fact that I am a 10 year cancer survivor.  This quilt helps me remember that.  The quilt is a combination of block projects, all in bright colors.

 

My Worker Bees designed an exchange that required participants to make 12.5″ blocks (any pattern) using dot or circle fabric. The block in the upper-right corner looks like just a solid white but it is actually a white and pale pink 9-patch.  No matter how much I fooled around with the exposure, I could not darken it enough to get a good image.

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I happened to have enough fabric from over 3 decades before from the Delta Xi Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma’s Greek Sing costumes.  I know we did songs from 42nd Street and I think we wore black leotards with cummerbunds made from pink and white polka dot fabric.  42nd Street became my favorite musical and my kids were subjected to the entire score throughout their childhood.

 

These two designs are a sample of the exchange blocks. You can see one was two simplistic swirls and another was a candy popper design.

 

When I got sick, I started getting super-cute 6.5″ cupcake blocks around my next birthday.  They were sent to me anonymously through the mail and I loved each and every one.

A couple of months after the first post-diagnosis birthday, the American Cancer Society had come up with their One More Birthday campaign which made these blocks even more meaningful.

I actually had to use 2 green fabrics in this quilt as I did not have enough of either.  One was random swirls and circles on a bright green background, the other was a Kelly green calico from the 1970s that my aunt had given me when she was cleaning out a closet.

 

Although it was machine-pieced, I did hand-quilt the entire quilt which ended up being about 77 x 77 inches.

I wanna be a Pi Beta Phi. Boom, Boom, and honey that ain’t no lie.Boom, Boom, I wanna be a Pi Beta Phi. Don’t you, don’t you, don’t you, Won’t you?

This quilt is made for a very loyal alumna of Bradley University. She pledged the Illinois Theta chapter of Pi Beta Phi as an undergraduate and is currently very involved in her local Pi Phi Alumnae Association. She also is a dog trainer extraordinaire and volunteers with her pets at local hospitals.

 

These shirts are quite vintage but they were in remarkably good shape.  Most of the sorority shirts I come across nowadays are t shirts that commemorate a formal or mixer.  I haven’t seen a football jersey letter shirt in years except of course on this circa 1980s shirt quilt. 🙂 Of course fraternity little sisters are not allowed anymore either.

 

The athletic teams at this university are known as the Bradley Braves.  The recipient was able to find a tiny applique patch of the original mascot.  The Native American mascot was ultimately considered offensive and is no longer in use.  They currently use the same team name but the mascot is a gargoyle.

 

I run the DC race in a potato sack I put a whole potato salad right down your back

This quilt is for the wife of a dentist.  She is a runner extraordinaire competing in races from 10Ks to full marathons.  This is especially admirable considering she has 3 kids and is a physical therapist.

All of the shirts are from races in or just outside the District.  Consequently many of the racing designs incorporate images of gorgeous cherry blossoms or the stately monuments.  I found a fabric that evoked a feel of cherry blossom pink along with her favorite shade of University of Tennessee orange.

My “guest photographer” took the pictures for this quilt, hence the unusual angle of the above photograph.

Instead of putting a label on the back, we used some fun dental-themed fabric in one of the blocks that was signed by the husband and kids.

Get in the game you gotta scheme All the same I’ve got the team

This quilt was a Father’s Day present for a HUGE all-sports Cincinnati fan.  He follows the professional teams, the NCAA colleges, and even some of the high school sports.

His wife asked for NO sashing between the blocks and wanted red borders despite the red t-shirt in the corner.

The tiger shows some microquilting on its nose.  Microquilting is done the same way as stippling but much closer, similar to the comparison of petit point and needlepoint.

A professor of science ’cause I keep droppin’ it I smell weak ’cause y’all keep poppin’ it

This quilt is for a Furman Palladin.  Like many college students she was very active in extracurriculars at school.

She was a health sciences major and participated in several fundraisers for improvements to third-world countries.  She was an equestrienne, a runner, and a bibliophile.

My signature technique of incorporating the architectural element of the garment  ie the usable pockets was able to be incorporated once again. 🙂

  

To all the party people who are happy and free (free), with K Buck M, we’re making history.

 

This quilt is for a recent Fighting Irish alumna.  Like most Domers, she is an avid football fan and was the proud owner of MANY season and bowl game shirts.  Not opting for sashing between the blocks makes a very different look.

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My trademark has been to keep what I call architectural elements of garments when possible.  The zipper hoodie square is quilted only on the perimeter, leaving the middle open so the shirt can be unzipped to see the 3 mini designs hidden underneath, 2 of which were from her academic department.

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The bottom block was made from a nylon flag.  The recipient actually interned for the Discovery Channel while an undergrad.

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Here is the Bengal boss inspecting my basting to make sure I am pinning the layers correctly.

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I put the pen to the paper and I went off. I’m dropping knowledge and wisdom like a mad head dog

This was a memorial quilt for a beloved pet.  Portia was a flat-coated retriever who lived just over a decade. 46 of these very large triangles were neckerchiefs that she would get at the groomers. When I saw them all, I immediately thought that she had a better wardrobe than me!

The two triangles below are not part of the 46.  Portia’s owner is a proud alumna member of Pi Beta Phi (Illinois Theta) and is very active in the Pi Phi Alumnae Association in her area. I needed to make 48 triangles to obtain a grid so I figured what better than some Pi Phi symbol fabric?

Portia was a canine volunteer for Fairfax Pets On Wheels, a wonderful organization connects pets with people living in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.  The blue neckerchief was her uniform when visiting shut-ins.
 

The block below came from a plain red neckerchief.  Portia’s owner also owns a lighthouse and Portia had visited the lighthouse before her demise.   I hand-embroidered an image of this lighthouse to add a little excitement to this triangle.
Bertschire’s A Flat Out Joyride 
“Portia” 
February 18, 2003 – May 11, 2013